Burmilla

Group Classification: Asian Group/shorthair
Country of Origin: Great Britain
Date of Origin: 1981
Weight (M): 8-10 lbs.
Weight (F): 6-8 lbs.
Life Expectancy: 15+ years

History
Some accidents are fortuitous, and the Burmilla is just that! In 1981 a Lilac Burmese and a Chinchilla Silver Persian managed to mate and despite it being unplanned, the resulting kittens were beautiful! The breed was developed from this point, with outcrosses back to Burmese and Chinchilla being used at various stages to strengthen the best traits. The Burmilla is the longest-established and most popular of the Asian Group of cats and is often used as a starting point for creating new varieties within this classification.

Longhair Burmillas are called Australian Tiffanies; Burmilla Smokes were once called Burmoires.

General Description
The Burmilla is a beautiful cat of medium foreign type, showing striking contrast between colored Shading/Tipping and Silver undercoat with delicate tracings of Tabby markings on the head, legs and tail. There should be a distinctive M mark on the forehead and their widely spaced ears angle slightly outward. All colors and patterns have brick red nose leather and paw pads, a distinctive identifier. Their eyes are yellow to green, with green being preferred in silvers and gold allowed in Selfs. They are firmly muscled overall.

Colors
Burmilla or shaded (solid or sepia), silver shaded colors and patterns, smoke colors (solid or sepia) and self colors:
Black, chocolate, red, blue, lilac, cream, caramel, apricot, tortoiseshell, chocolate tortie, blue tortie, lilac tortie, caramel tortie
Tabby colors (all patterns in solid, sepia)
Brown, chocolate, red, blue, lilac, cream, caramel, apricot, tortoiseshell, chocolate tortie, blue tortie, lilac tortie, caramel tortie
Silver Tabby colors and patterns are as for standard tabbies

Coat
Shorthair to semi-longhair

Notable Features
Eyes are the stunning feature of this cat: they can be any shade of green to gold surrounded with dark outlines framed by thin white'spectacles' of fur, which makes it look like the Burmilla is wearing eyeliner.

Health and Care
Burmillas are less boisterous than the typical Burmese, but more sociable than Persians. Even-tempered, they are very very affectionate. While they are largely maintenance free other than regular petting for shine, he semi-longhair varieties will require more diligence to remove debris and prevent mats and knots.

Resources
The Burmilla Cat Club at www.burmilla.co.uk/